Essay Key Terms

Essay Key Terms-38
Key Terms in Writing - Kinds of Essays KEY TERMS IN WRITING All of the below-mentioned kinds of essays require the following elements: THE WRITING PROCESS The writing process begins when you first open your class text and start and ends when you turn in the very final draft.Often the process can be broken down into parts: pre-writing, drafting, revision (which includes editing).Many writers merely list ideas and their evidence, rather than linking one to the next.

Key Terms in Writing - Kinds of Essays KEY TERMS IN WRITING All of the below-mentioned kinds of essays require the following elements: THE WRITING PROCESS The writing process begins when you first open your class text and start and ends when you turn in the very final draft.Often the process can be broken down into parts: pre-writing, drafting, revision (which includes editing).Many writers merely list ideas and their evidence, rather than linking one to the next.

The writing process, however, is much more recursive and complicated than the parts suggest.

For instance, pre-writing, despite its name, includes reading; revision (re-seeing your ideas) happens throughout the writing process, and so on. Oftentimes the weaknesses in an essay are caused by problems in the writer's writing process: usually writers move too quickly to the drafting stage and do not revise their work, substituting small editorial changes for revision.

Given the argument, the final paragraph must, because of the break down and/or expansion of the thesis, offer something new to the reader.

The key to writing arguments, however, is the connections made between ideas and their evidence.

Task words direct you and tell you how to go about answering a question.

Here is a list of such words and others that you are most likely to come across frequently in your course.

This is a problem if your goal is either to prove or to persuade.

In most cases, you should try to avoid the classic high school, or five paragraph essay: opening paragraph that states a thesis, three paragraphs that offer evidence for the thesis, and a conclusion that repeats the thesis. College-level arguments include more than one idea. The type of evidence required (statistical data, graphs, empirical data, paraphrased textual evidence, quotations, analogies, anecdotes, etc.) is determined by the thesis, but all evidence requires introduction (a brief discussion on how the quotation fits into its original context and what the context is), summary (a brief discussion of what the quotation means; if the meaning is self evident, then a paraphrase will suffice), and interpretation (why you find the quotation interesting and how it links to your argument). Additionally, all evidence must be woven into your text -- and must make grammatical sense.

In some essays, like a personal essay, the thesis is not stated; rather it is implied via an anecdote, an image, or metaphor.

Most often, you do not know what your thesis will be until you've written a few drafts, and even then, your thesis is still developing. Other words for a thesis are conclusion, hypothesis, claim, main idea and promise.

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