Huckleberry Finn Essays On Morality

Huckleberry Finn Essays On Morality-36
Forced to reconcile his personal feelings of friendship for an escaped slave (Jim) with what society has told him is “right,” Huck learns through the course of the story to trust his moral instincts.

Forced to reconcile his personal feelings of friendship for an escaped slave (Jim) with what society has told him is “right,” Huck learns through the course of the story to trust his moral instincts.As the story progresses, we see Huck’s character develop strong morals that eventually lead to his reconciliation.

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Below is the first of the student essays: Where do moral values come from?

Which of these potential sources does Twain privilege over the others? Bonnie submitted several essays on behalf of her students to the Renaissance Review for everyone to enjoy reading their thoughtful responses to this intriguing question on a classic tale.

” While floating down the Mississippi, Huck and Jim come across a shipwreck.

Huck, being the young, curious boy he is wants to explore it.

He feels guilty for helping Jim escape, and “knows” what he did was wrong.

Many times he almost decides to turn Jim in, but each time he realizes he cares about his friend Jim, and decides to keep helping him.At first Huck sees no problem with helping Jim, and is only glad that he now has some company.As Huck goes on his adventure with Jim though, he has numerous internal debates regarding whether he should help Jim to escape or not.As the story progresses, Huck begins to see Jim, not just as a slave, but as a person, and as his friend.Before Huck ran away, he learned many of society’s morals from his “sivilized” lifestyle.He believes that helping Jim is wrong, but he refuses to betray his friend, because he knows that would be wrong as well.Today it seems obvious that Huck was doing the right thing in helping Jim escape from slavery, since society has now recognized that slavery is wrong.Huck knows he is defying society by not turning Jim in, but he continues to stay by Jim’s side and feels he can’t betray him as their friendship grows.This is an internal moral struggle for Huck, because he knows to society he is “wrong,” but to him their friendship made it “right.But in Huck’s time, helping Jim to escape was considered stealing, and Huck knew stealing was wrong.However, Huck also knew that helping his friend Jim was the right thing to do, even if “sivilized” society, at the time, thought it was wrong.

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